i-Studovna

QUANTIFIERS

 

We use quantifiers when we want to give some one information about the number of something: how much or how many.

 

  1. Much / many
  2. A lot of / a lots of
  3. A few / a little

 

1. MUCH / MANY

MUCH - things that you can't count or don't have plurals

ham, bread, water

 

How much money do you have?

There isn't much coffee left.

There's not much work this week.

I don't have much time today.

 

MANY - things that you can count or have plurals

an egg (2 eggs), a day (7 days)

 

How many friends do you have?

There isn't many potatoes left. 

They don't have many days to complete it.

There weren't many people in the cinema.

 

 

2. A LOT OF / LOTS OF

 

- We use a lot of / lots of with countable and uncountable nouns. Both forms are used in singular and in plural senteces.

 

There are a lot of / lots of students.

A lot of / lots of people come to my party.

We waste a lot of / lots of time.

She had a lot of / lots of books in her bag.

 

- The main difference between the terms in each pair is the degree of formality.

 

So we can say or write registry:

There are a lot of people over there.

 

or say the same sentence in less formal and irreverent way:

There are lots of people over there.

 

 

3. A FEW / A LITTLE 

 


A FEW - some, a small number, we used them with plural countable nouns. 

a few people, a few oranges

 

I have a few  good friends.

We still have a few cakes left.

Can I ask you a few questions?

 

 A LITTLE - some, a small number, we used them with uncountable nouns. 

a little time, a little money

 

We've got a little time before the train leaves.

He speaks a little English.

There is a little juice in the glass.